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  1. Appalachian States Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact
  2. Central Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact
  3. Central Midwest Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact
    The Central Midwest Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact was developed as an effort to facilitate the efficient and proper management of low-level radioactive waste generated within the Midwest region. The compact provides for the instrument and framework for a cooperative effort; providing sufficient facilities for the proper management of low-level radioactive waste generated in the region; protecting the health and safety of the citizens of the region; limiting the number of facilities required to manage low-level radioactive waste generated in the region effectively and efficiently; promoting the volume and source reduction of low-level radioactive waste generated in the region; distributing the costs, benefits and obligations of successful low-level radioactive waste management equitably among the party states and among generators and other persons who use regional facilities to manage their waste; ensuring the ecological and economical management of low-level radioactive waste, including the prohibition of shallow-land burial of waste; and promoting the use of above-ground facilities and other disposal technologies providing greater and safer confinement of low-level radioactive waste than shallow-land burial facilities.
  4. Midwest Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact
    It is the policy of the party states to enter into a regional low-level radioactive waste disposal compact for the purpose of providing the instrument and framework for a cooperative effort; providing sufficient facilities for the proper disposal of low-level radioactive waste generated in the region; protecting the health and safety of the citizens of the region; limiting the number of facilities required to effectively and efficiently dispose of low-level radioactive waste generated in the region; encouraging source reduction and the environmentally sound treatment of waste that is generated to minimize the amount of waste to be disposed of; ensuring that the costs, expenses, liabilities, and obligations of low-level radioactive waste disposal are paid by generators and other persons who use compact facilities to dispose of their waste; ensuring that the obligations of low-level radioactive waste disposal that are the responsibility of the party states are shared equitably among them; ensuring that the party states that comply with the terms of this compact and fulfill their obligations under it share equitably in the benefits of the successful disposal of low-level radioactive waste; and ensuring the environmentally sound, economical, and secure disposal of low-level radioactive wastes.
  5. Northeast Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact
  6. Northwest Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management
    The party states recognize that low-level radioactive wastes are generated by essential activities and services that benefit the citizens of the states. It is further recognized that the protection of the health and safety of the citizens of the party states and the most economical management of low-level radioactive wastes can be accomplished through cooperation of the states in minimizing the amount of handling and transportation required to dispose of such wastes and through the cooperation of the states in providing facilities that serve the region. It is the policy of the party states to undertake the necessary cooperation to protect the health and safety of the citizens of the party states and to provide for the most economical management of low-level radioactive wastes on a continuing basis. It is the purpose of this compact to provide the means for such a cooperative effort among the party states so that the protection of the citizens of the states and the maintenance of the viability of the states' economies will be enhanced while sharing the responsibilities of radioactive low-level waste management.
  7. Pacific States Agreement on Radioactive Materials Transportation
    Establishes the Pacific States Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee to develop model regulatory standards for party states relating to routing and inspecting shipments of radioactive material. Radioactive material is defined by the U.S. Dept. of Transportation, 40 C.F.R. § 173. It includes, but is not limited to high level and low level radioactive waste, spent nuclear fuel, as defined in Section 2 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1983 (96 Stat. 2202, 42 U.S.C.A. Sec. 10101). Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming are eligible. The compact becomes effective when enacted into law by two states. A 1997 Oregon legislative staff summary indicates that this compact may have been superseded by the Western Interstate Energy Board, and is thus likely to be dormant or defunct.
  8. Rocky Mountain Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact
    It is the purpose of the party states, by entering into an interstate compact, to establish the means for cooperative effort in managing low-level radioactive waste; to ensure the availability and economic viability of sufficient facilities for the proper and efficient management of low-level radioactive waste generated within the region while preventing unnecessary and uneconomic proliferation of such facilities; to encourage reduction of the volume of low-level radioactive waste requiring disposal within the region; to restrict management within the region of low-level radioactive waste generated outside the region; to distribute the costs, benefits and obligations of low-level radioactive waste management equitably among the party states; and by these means to promote the health, safety and welfare of the residents within the region.
  9. Southeast Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact
  10. Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact
    California is the host state. A Ward Valley site in San Bernardino County was licensed in September 1993, but ownership of the site was in litigation. According to the Fiscal Year 2002 Host State Report On The Status Of The Regional Disposal Facility, “The California Department of Health Services reported that on May 3, 2000 US Ecology filed suit in Superior Court, San Diego County (US Ecology v. The State of California; California Department of Health Services; Gray Davis, in his capacity as Governor of California; Diana M. Bontá, in her capacity as Director of the California Department of Health Services). Plaintiff alleged that defendants breached express and implied agreements and failed to act in good faith to ensure that a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility was established in California. Plaintiff sought issuance of a writ of mandate directing the State of California to act in a timely manner to establish a regional low-level radioactive waste disposal facility at the previously-selected site in Ward Valley, declaratory relief stating that defendants breached and/or repudiated certain binding promises; and reimbursement and damages representing costs and lost profits in an amount not less than $162 million, plus $1 million per month. On September 22, 2000, the court issued a tentative ruling sustaining defendant's demurrer on each cause of action, without leave to amend. On November 27, 2000, the plaintiff appealed the decision to the California Court of Appeal, Fourth Appellate District. On September 5, 2001, the Court of Appeal reversed the lower court’s decision solely on the issue of damages based on the one remaining cause of action on the theory of promissory estoppel. The case was returned to the trial court for trial and reassigned to Judge E. Mac Amos. The trial was scheduled for early 2003.
  11. Texas Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact
    The party states recognize a responsibility for each state to seek to manage low-level radioactive waste generated within its boundaries, pursuant to the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act, as amended by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (42 U.S.C. Sections 2021b-2021j). They also recognize that the United States Congress, by enacting the Act, has authorized and encouraged states to enter into compacts for the efficient management and disposal of low-level radioactive waste. It is the policy of the party states to cooperate in the protection of the health, safety, and welfare of their citizens and the environment and to provide for and encourage the economical management and disposal of low-level radioactive waste. It is the purpose of this compact to provide the framework for such a cooperative effort; to promote the health, safety, and welfare of the citizens and the environment of the party states; to limit the number of facilities needed to effectively, efficiently, and economically manage low-level radioactive waste and to encourage the reduction of the generation thereof; and to distribute the costs, benefits, and obligations among the party states; all in accordance with the terms of the compact.
  12. Texas Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact